Tata Hexa Facelift First Drive

Tata Hexa Overview

While Tata has now launched the Tata Harrier, the Tata Hexa remains the brand’s flagship 7-seater car. The Hexa is available with a 2.2-litre Varicor engine in two states of tune – 150PS and 156PS. While the former produces 320Nm of torque, the latter generates an impressive 400Nm of torque. It is being offered with a choice of seven variants – XE, XM, XM+, XT, XMA, XTA and XT 4×4. The Tata Hexa looks tough yet classy and is loaded with convenience and safety features even in the base variant. But can that help establish Tata as a premium carmaker and wipe off the sour aftertaste of the Aria? Let’s find out.

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The new Hexa is definitely a huge step up compared to the Aria. It will take on the likes of the Mahindra XUV500 and also slug it out with the lower variants of the Toyota Innova Crysta.The new Hexa from Tata is a compelling product and, at the current price point, we think it is a well-rounded, value-for-money offering. Check for car loan interest rate at Fincarz.

Tata Hexa Look

Tata say that every panel on the Hexa has been redesigned, so nothing is shared with the Aria. It clearly feels that way. Up close you can see that the aggression is crafted with class. There is a bull-horn like chrome strip sitting along the bottom of the grille. Gently rounded hexagonal forms texture the grille, giving a sense of keen attention. The clamshell bonnet with its masculine lines and the gaping air vents below give the Hexa’s claim to being an SUV quite a boost. The double-barrel headlamps are the only familiar bits here.

Switch around to the other end and you will see that there is a distinct squareness to the design. The small spoiler also accentuates a more upright stance. The slim D-pillar-mounted tail lamps have been done away with; instead there are chunky angular lamps that wrap around onto the tail gate. There’s enough chrome on the tailgate to please most Indians. The only awkward bit at the rear are the hockey-stick shaped lights that sit on the bumper.

Viewed from the side, the connection to the Aria is all too obvious. But, the rugged cladding and the 19-inch wheels help the Hexa strike a strong pose. The drop down elements from the roof towards the D-pillar and the fin on the shoulder give it a distinctive look. This is where you realise the Hexa is massive – it is longer and wider than the Mahindra XUV500, and the Innova Crysta. Its 2850mm wheelbase is also the longest, albeit identical to the Aria. There are clear benefits of these dimensions as we can see on the inside.

Tata Hexa Comfort

Tata Motors vehicle in the past. Its great how consistently we have said this of all the recent Tata products – meaning with each car, the company is taking big strides off late. The all-black interior gets a hearty dose of leather on the dashboard and on the door panels along with the leather seats on the top of the line variant. The seats are not only well designed but also feel top notch in terms of their tactile feel with a really good grain of leather running through as well. My only grouse is the slight lack of shoulder support on the front seats and the fact that the padding seems a little harder than it should be.

The central console gets a touchscreen infotainment unit with navigation (that syncs with your smartphone) and an array of options including bluetooth and smartphone integration. There is no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto but the Hexa does offer an app based control system that helps you play your collection of songs from a Juke-Car App – similar to the one in the Tiago. The app also has systems like service and diagnostic tools, navigation support and options to choose the ambient lighting (of which there are eight colour options). The multi-functional steering wheel gets cruise control, audio and telephone controls, and is height adjustable.

The simple gloss black console combined with a chrome wraparound is pleasing to the eye and so are the well placed chrome/brushed aluminium accent pieces around the dashboard and the AC vent. The climate control knobs are placed slightly lower than they should have but you do get used to them very quickly. The horizontal central console on the automatic houses the gear shift lever enclosed in a black bezel. You get just one cup-holder and no real slot to place your smartphone apart from the central flip up storage space between the seats. For Tata Hexa  check getreadyoregon

You can get the Hexa in either a six or seven seater configuration. Rear leg space in both versions is quite healthy and the rear passengers get their own AC vents in the centre and on the B-pillars. The third row could get slightly cramped if you are of average height but passengers do get their own storage space and charging points. The Hexa’s large glass area makes it quite airy on the inside and even without something like a panoramic sunroof, it does feel very bright – especially good considering an all-black interior can seem to make the car appear to be cramped.

Tata Hexa Gearbox

The Hexa will be available with a sole diesel engine, in two states of tune. The 2.2-litre, four-cylinder engine is the same powerplant we’ve seen do duties under the bonnet of the Safari, the Safari Storme and the Aria. The base XE variant of the Hexa gets a 150PS / 320Nm tune, whereas the mid XM and the top-spec XT variant gets 156PS / 400Nm to play around with. The other notable difference happens to be the gearbox. While the lower tune is available exclusively with a 5-speed manual, the latter gets a choice of a 6-speed manual transmission or a 6-speed torque converter automatic.

The engine comes to life with a shake and stir, just like we’re used to with big Tata vehicles. That said, it isn’t audible isn’t the cabin unless you decide to drive somewhere in a hurry. NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) levels are well within control and the cabin feels isolated from most of the fuss outside. The motor isn’t a particularly fun to drive unit, and feels more at ease at cruising speeds. Torque spread is even, and there isn’t a sudden gush of shove that will pin you to your seat. What you get instead is linear power delivery, with perceptible turbo lag under 1500rpm.

On the manual variants, the clutch is relatively light, but isn’t progressive at all. In fact, the first time you drive the Hexa, there’s a high chance you would stall it. The bite point is vague, which keeps you guessing. The other fly in the ointment, is the fact that the gears aren’t sure slotting – especially into fifth and sixth. But, get going and you get used to it pretty quickly.

You also get ‘Super Drive’ modes, that can be toggled on the fly. The effective modes are the result of varying calibrations of the engine and throttle map, the ESP and the ABS module that lets you set up the Hexa for intended usage. The modes on offer include Auto, Comfort, Dynamic and Rough-Road. While it functions as a rear-wheel drive in Comfort and Dynamic, it transmits power to the front wheels in the other two modes. The modes work without a hiccup – but we preferred to leave it in Auto for most of the time we drove it.

The other big talking point about the Hexa is the 6-speed automatic transmission. This engine-transmission is easily one of the best in the segment. Certainly superior to the XUV500 AT. It is our pick out of the two since it makes driving so much easier. Shifts are smooth and quick and there’s barely any head-nod associated with automatics. It’s also reasonably fuel efficient, delivering a tested 11kmpl in city and 14.50kmpl on the highway. The gearbox selects ratios very well and responds to the varying weight of your right foot quickly. For a spot of spirited driving, you can always slot the gearbox into Sports mode, or into Manual altogether, to take charge. The transmission holds the revs in the meaty mid-range, giving you a healthy amount of torque in reserve for those roll-on accelerations. The 20-80kmph (kickdown) took a tested 7.68 seconds, while 0-100kmph takes about 12.3 seconds, which is on par with rivals like the Mahindra XUV500.

Tata Hexa Rideing

There’s no getting away from it, the way the Aria tackles bad roads is very impressive. The 19-inch wheels make short work of lightly broken roads. The way the recalibrated suspension shrugs off bigger potholes and ditches is shocking at first. Tata say that the use of multivalve dampers has helped the suspension tackle off-road better while improving ride quality, too. No doubt, you can feel that at work on our roads, too.

The chassis has also been made more rigid and this has helped tune the suspension better, too. The stiffer setup of the suspension at the rear has been done to make the Hexa more sporty to drive. What is apparent is that at highway speeds, it feels absolutely composed and does well to mask its size when being steered through traffic. However, if hustled hard you will feel the body roll, albeit in a controlled manner.

Disappointingly, the hydraulic steering feels light and vague at highways speeds. There is too much slack at centre and when turning into a corner, it ends up feeling disconnected and vague. Also, despite the disc brake setup all round, prodding the brake pedal inspires little confidence. It’s only when you push hard that pace drops as required. The Hexa could certainly do with more powerful brakes.

Tata Hexa Safety

In terms of safety specs, the Tata Hexa 2019 comes fully loaded with features like 6 airbags, electronic stability program, traction control, hill ascent and descent control and ABS.In terms of safety tech, the Hexa is loaded to the brim with goodies such as 6 airbag, electronic stability program, traction control, hill ascent and descent control and anti-lock brakes.

Tata Hexa Price in Mumbai

Tata Hexa On-Road Price in Mumbai ranges from 14,31,668 to 20,83,927 for variants Hexa XE and Hexa XT 4X4 respectively. Tata Hexa is available in 7 variants and 5 colours. Below are details of Tata Hexa variants price in Mumbai. Check for Hexa price in Mumbai at Tryaldrive.

Tata Hexa bottomline

The Aria’s quite a capable machine and Tata has done well to build on its strengths while making up for its shortcomings. The Hexa’s spacious cabin with three rows of seats, its ability to shrug off bad roads, commanding driving position and easy driving manners make for a great machine to cover long distances in. Yes, it will be a bit cumbersome to steer in the city and fit-finish of the interiors could be better. Nonetheless Tata look to tackle the Mahindra XUV500 head on with the Hexa and if priced right, the Hexa has not just the manners, but the look and the appeal to make it happen this time around. Quite simply, the Hexa is SUV enough, rich enough and fresh enough to deliver an overall experience that feels quite welcome for those looking for a rugged three-row SUV.

Tata Tigor Facelift Engine & Transmission

Tata Tigor Overview

Tata Motors gets the credit of inception of the sub-4 meter sedan segment with the introduction of Indigo around a decade back in 2007. Then, again in August 2014, in an attempt to further exploit the sub-compact sedan segment, the company launched the Zest sedan in the Indian market. But now, as the aforementioned sedan duo is ageing and doesn’t consist of contemporary features as its counterparts, Tata has come up with yet another sub 4-meter sedan in form of the all-new Tigor. Being based on the super successful Tiago hatchback, it had its first public appearance at the 2016 Auto Expo. Tata Tigor is offered in both petrol and diesel fuel trims in four grades: XE, XT, XZ and XZ (O). The all-new Tata Tigor features several styling and interior elements, along with the same set of petrol and diesel motors as the sibling hatch. Tata has termed the Tigor as ‘Styleback’ and it comes with the best-in-segment boot capacity of 419 litre. Check for Tata Car Models Price in CarzPrice

Tata Tigor Look

The Tigor compact sedan underpins slightly tweaked version of the XO platform. Although the car uses the same platform, the wheelbase has been extended by 50 more mm to add the extra amount of space for the rear passengers.Coming to its exterior styling, we must inform you all that the Tigor Styleback looks far better than any other compact sedans of the Indian market. It is quite evident that the Tigor hurriedly did not finish designing the car. It does not have any disproportionate lines towards the B-Pillar onward while the boot and the rear profile blends perfectly with the overall design quite well. The sloping roofline towards the rear of the car and that integrated roof spoiler with the stop lamps adds a premium appeal to the Styleback. The rear profile also features a wraparound split LED taillamps which look gorgeous with the Hexagonal elements in it. The lower bumper at the rear profile looks bulky which has helped in making the sedan appear slightly bigger than its sibling Tiago.

Apart from the newly done rear profile, the front and side profile gets the same treatment as seen on the Tiago hatchback. Fewer changes to the front include a smoked projector headlamp which also gets integrated LED DRL’s as well. The lower bumper houses round shaped fog lamps with chrome embellishments. The Tigor also gets Tata’s signature grille with Hexagonal detailing and Tata Motors logo at the centre; this grille can also be found in the Tiago hatchback as well. The side profile too looks identical to the hatchback with no such noticeable changes. However, it does get two different alloy wheel patterns for the petrol and diesel variants respectively.Thus with all the changes mentioned above calling the Tata Tigor one of the most proportionate looking compact sedan’s currently available in the Indian market won’t be an understatement

Tata Tigor Space

Although there are plenty of changes on the exterior Tata Motors decided not to mess too much with the cabin inside for the Tigor. You can clearly notice that the steering wheel, dashboard, instrument cluster and everything else that you see shared with the Tigor hatchback. However, the changes do come in the form of a new 5.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system which housed in the middle of the dash.

What else is also new is the rear seat design. Tata Motors calls it a sofa because the back seat stretched to the both the edge of the door opening; the rear seat also gets a foldable rear armrest with two additional cupholders exclusive to Tigor. There are also plenty of cubby holes inside the cabin as well Tata says that there are as much as 17 cubby holes inside the cabin which is quite practical. The extended wheelbase has not only helped in extracting the maximum amount of knee room for the rear passengers but boot space as well. The Tigor gets an impressive 419 Litres of boot space at the back of this compact car which definitely will come in handy for the customers of this segment.

Overall the interior looks spacious (credit goes to the extended wheelbase), well-equipped thanks to the new touchscreen infotainment screen, automatic climate control (available on the top end variant) and JBL speakers. The seats too look comfortable because it is slightly more reclined and can comfortably accommodate 3 average side adults. Furthermore, the cabin also gets plenty of cubby holes as well which really comes in handy during long tours.

Tata Tigor Performance

Like the Tiago, the Tigor will be offered with a 1.05-litre, three-cylinder diesel engine and a 1.2-litre, three-cylinder petrol engine. Both engines come mated to five-speed gearboxes, albeit with shorter gearing to compensate for the 50kg weight increment over the Tiago.The diesel engine makes 70hp of power and 140Nm of torque, figures which are quite low by segment standards. And the fact is the diesel engine feels adequate, but no more. Performance in town is fair and you’ll be able to keep up with traffic, but when you want to overtake, you’ll miss that mid-range surge we’ve just come to expect from even small turbo-diesels. There is a mild step up in power at 2,000rpm but power delivery remains flat thereafter, forcing you to downshift when you need to get a quick move on. Out on the highway too, you will often be left wanting for power. The diesel engine is also on the noisier side and sounds thrummy when extended. For their part, the gearbox is smooth in operation, though not slick, and the clutch is reasonably light too.

For most urban buyers though, the petrol Tigor would be the one of greater interest. The petrol Tigor uses the same engine as the one on the Tiago but Tata has added a balancer shaft to cut vibrations here. The inclusion of the balancer also required recalibration of the ECU and the net effect is the engine feels far nicer than it does in the Tiago. Vibrations are significantly reduced and fueling seems cleaner too; power delivery is noticeably smoother than the petrol Tiago. Performance in town is decent with reasonable responses to throttle inputs. Fairly smooth gearshifts and the light clutch also help the experience. Still, the 85hp engine does little to excite. The build-up of power is flat throughout the rev range (it revs until 6,500rpm) and it simply lacks zing. And when revved hard, the engine doesn’t sound particularly nice either.

Tata Tigor Driving

In terms of driving, the Tata Tigor ride has a very supple ride. It irons out most of the road bumps and it does a fairly good job. The handling too, is one of the best in its segment. Push it around a bend and the hatchback does a good job. The steering wheel is light and still has good enough feedback. This is what makes it stand out.The fuel tank capacity of the Tata Tigor is 35 litres, which will be sufficient for long road trips as well. The ride quality of this vehicle is good and what stands is its handling. It is a good mix of ride quality and handling characteristics. The ABS on offer comes with EBD (electronic brake force distribution), corner stability control (CSC) for enhanced braking efficiency. Check for Tata car dealers in India

Tata Tigor Safety

Tata Motors is offering the new Tigor with dual front airbags, ABS, EBD with cornering stability control. The Tigor hasn’t been crash tested yet but the body panels and the sheet metal feels quite solid and well built, specially when you open/close the doors. Tata has a wide network across the country and with the success of the Tiago, their after sales have become much better. The Tigor is expected to offer low maintenance with reasonably priced servicing and spare parts.

Tata Tigor Price

Tata Tigor Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 4,70,800/- (Tigor XE Petrol) to 7,05,034/- (Tigor XZ O Diesel). Get best offers for Tata Tigor from Tata Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Tigor price in Hyderabad

Tata Tigor Bottomline

After spending some time with the Tigor, we believe Tata Motors have got another winner in their hands after the Tiago, if they price it well. The Styleback design of the Tigor is unique and looks quite appealing, the interiors are loaded with features, the cabin is spacious and practical while the engines are also fuel efficient. If accepted well in the market, the Tigor can give some serious threat to the compact sedan segment.