Renault Captur First Drive Review

Renault Captur

Renault Captur Overview

Renault India may be a relatively young brand but because of well thought-out mass market products like the Duster and the Kwid doing well, they have managed to roll on the right path and gain a respectable market share. While the Kwid continues to sell in strong numbers, keeping Renault India in the small car game, the brand is struggling in the crossover space, what with the Duster feeling the heat from newer rivals. Enter the Captur, an all-new offering which represents a paradigm shift in crossover design for Renault. Unlike the Duster which follows the traditional boxy ethos of an SUV as we know it, the Captur is more streamlined and its design carries a lot more flair.

Anticipation is high, then, and the style-heavy Captur needs to punch above its weight to do well in the premium crossover segment which includes the hot selling Hyundai Creta and the impressive Jeep Compass.

Renault Captur Look

The Renault Captur 2017 is based on the same platform on which the Duster is made. However, both Renault Captur and Duster have nothing in common when it comes to exterior design, style and overall looks. Renault Captur seems inspired from European design language with curves, swooped lines and a trendy appearance, which will be liked by people of all ages.

On its front, the Captur boasts a small yet muscular bonnet diving down at the front between well-designed chrome grille and good-looking headlight assembly. The front bumper with integrated C-shaped LED daytime running lamps and fog lamps gels very well with the design language. On its side profile, the 17-inch ‘crystal cut’ wheels look simply superb. The rear has a clean and refreshing design, which goes very well with trendiness of Renault Captur car.

Renault Captur Comfort

Is it familiar? Yes, it’s easy to spot bits that are from Renault’s parts bin, such as the AC vents, climate control console and infotainment screen. However, that’s not to say the Captur doesn’t offer something unique. The auto AC console may be similar but gets rubberized dials to add a degree of tactility. The plastics are still hard to touch but are far better than what we’ve seen in the Duster. That said, they just fall short of being called ‘premium’. The glovebox cover in particular, feels very flimsy and makes you wonder if one hard enough pothole will make it come loose. For more information on Renault Captur  visit Iiit-bh

You do need to give the Captur’s interior more time to make its first impression, but once you spend enough time in it, it’s easy to appreciate the upmarket bits. The white and gold faux leather-draped ergo-design seats reek of quality, with the diamond quilting adding a touch of German car finesse. The leather makes its way onto the door pads and centre armrest too, which lifts up the experience a few notches. The seats, front or rear, aren’t just eye candy either. They really are supportive, even of larger frames, and will be very handy on long distance drives.

The driving position, though, is a mixed bag. The panoramic design means you have a great view of the road ahead, aided by the relatively slim A-pillar, which makes visibility at T-junctions more convenient. You also get a commanding drive position, with the bonnet falling into view even with the seat set to its lowest. However, that’s where the problem lies. The default seat height is far too high, so even drivers just under 6ft in height will find the roof a bit close for comfort, while tall drivers will feel cramped. This isn’t an issue in the Duster. We also wish telescopic steering adjustment was offered, instead of the current tilt-only setup.

The ergonomics aren’t as fluid as what you’d see in a Maruti or Hyundai either. You do get an eco-drive mode and cruise control but the buttons are placed at your right knee, which isn’t where you’d expect them to be. Even the front cupholders are placed just ahead of the gearlever, so engage an odd gear and accessing anything kept here will be tricky. But then, you start appreciating some quirks, like the Duster-spec infotainment controls that sit behind the steering wheel, which you quickly start appreciating over traditional steering-mounted controls. You even get a pretty large, closed storage spot atop the dashboard, which could come in handy to slot your phone into while using navigation, provided you use an anti-slip mat.

Finally, the space has been better used than in the Duster, even though both cars share their 2673mm wheelbase. It helps free up a little more knee room in both seat rows and while headroom is underserved for taller folks up front, the rear seat didn’t have the same issue. It can also seat 3 at the rear quite well, even with the rear AC vents console. For added convenience, there’s an armrest in between for when you’re travelling four-up. However, ingress/egress in the rear is a pain point. The B-pillar is intrusive and constricts the passage way. Senior citizens will like the tall seat, but swinging their legs in will require some effort from the thighs, as they’ll have to avoid hitting the pillar with their feet. Check for car loan interest calculator.

The boot’s plenty accommodating at 392 litres, with no intrusive bulges or plus-sized loading lip to spoil the fun. The rear seat does fold down and helps make room for a lot of luggage, but doesn’t split 60:40, nor does it drop flat.

Renault Captur Gearbox

On the road, the Captur could be best described as ‘comfortable’. More on that later… Now we ought to make it clear that the India-spec Captur is quite different from the one sold in the Europe. The Captur that we will be getting is based on Renault’s MO platform for emerging markets, which is why the brand has stuck with the tried and tested 1.5-litre K9K diesel motor. That being said, there is a vast difference in the way the Captur and the Duster behave on the road.

The Captur and the Duster share the same 1.5-litre 110bhp/240Nm diesel motor, however, the refinement levels are world apart. The Captur is significantly quieter on the move thanks to better insulation and a less noisy motor – one can hardly hear the diesel clatter once the windows are up. What’s more, the Captur also accelerates in a more linear manner than the Duster when the motor is on boost. For those who are wondering, there is still some turbo lag under 2,000rpm, post which the Captur pulls strongly till 4,500rpm or thereabout. The motor’s got enough torque lower down the rev range to propel the Captur through traffic without ever feeling like it needs to be worked too hard. To our surprise, even the clutch feel is different compared to the Duster – it’s more precise and not as heavy either.

Like the Duster, the Captur simply devours bad roads and manages to hover across giant potholes without unsettling itself. Yes, it is slightly stiff when compared to the Duster but the trade-off to this is better high speed poise when driving over undulated roads. Perhaps the most impressive bit is the way it rebounds quickly from any sharp bump you might encounter, regaining composure almost immediately. The only minor downside though, is the amount of noise that filters into the cabin. Over coarse-chip surfaces the interior plastics rattle a little too much and overall there’s some noticeable wind noise, too.

Renault Captur Riding

The ride, like the Duster’s, is a strong point. The Captur’s ground clearance means bad roads leave no scraping scares and even on really bad patches, it still pummels through everything, letting very little seep into the cabin. It is noticeably stiffer than the Duster, so you don’t get the exact same sense of indestructibility but it balances the marginal loss with better stability. Even though the Renault Captur sits tall, body roll is managed well and it doesn’t feel top heavy, even through sharp corners. Book Renault Captur Test Drive.

Driver’s car then? Well, no. The chassis is set up well but the steering is a little too heavy and while it is fairly responsive, there is no feel or feedback. Charge at a sharp turn and you feel unsure of where the tyres are facing. Like the Duster, the steering also has kickback through hard turns, albeit to a milder degree.

Renault Captur Safety

The list of Renault Captur safety features include Front Disc Brakes, Drum on Rear, ABS with EBD, Rear Parking Sensors, Central Locking, Driver & Passenger Airbags, Crash Sensors, Rear Seat Belts, Seat Belt Warning, Power Door Lock, Child Safety Locks, Side & Front Impact Beams, Passenger Side Rear View Mirror, Rear Camera, Centrally Mounted Fuel Tank, Engine Immobilizer, Automatic Headlamps, Follow Me Home Headlamps and ISOFIX Child Seat.

Renault Captur Price in Pune

Renault Captur On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 11,86,647 to 16,92,512 for variants Captur RXE Petrol and Captur Platine Mono Diesel respectively. Renault Captur is available in 10 variants and 5 colours. Below are details of Renault Captur variants price in Pune. Check for Renault Captur price in Pune at Autozhop.

Renault Captur Bottomline

Put simply, the Captur is an interesting car. At first, it looks like a generic crossover but as you get closer its European design elements stand out and you realise that there is nothing quite like it in this segment – both the Creta and the Compass carry traditional crossover design cues.

The real question here, though, is whether the Captur advances the crossover game forward for Renault. It’s certainly improved over the Duster in many key areas including engine refinement, gearshift quality, cabin ergonomics and ride quality. However, it trails behind its rivals when it comes to interior quality and drivetrain options. Renault, then, have got to play their pricing card right to regain some momentum in the crossover segment. We expect the top-spec Kaptur to come in at a premium of around Rs 1 lakh over the Duster 110PS RxZ.

Renault Duster Facelift First Drive Review

Renault Duster

Renault Duster Overview

Let’s face it, established carmakers like Maruti Suzuki and Hyundai are now alarmingly vulnerable to some sales beating from Renault more than ever. The latter, here in India, is a relatively young automotive player, after all. That said, thanks to well thought-out products like the Kwid and the Duster doing extremely well, Renault India has managed to trundle along the right path and gain a respectable market share in a short span of time. While the Kwid is still factory-fresh and off to a flying start, it’s been nearly four years since the Duster practically kickstarted the compact SUV trend as we know it. Check for car loan interest calculator.

After introducing a handful of special editions and an all-wheel drive version based on it, Renault India has pensioned off the original Duster. Subsequently, the brand has dished out a major facelift for the model, complete with refreshed styling, a better-equipped interior and an all-important automatic gearbox option. On paper, then, this new Duster comfortably outdoes the original, but is it any better to take on the opposition?

Renault Duster Look

When it comes to basic design and looks, there are no changes. However, the company has given several tweaks here and there to give it a distinct look from the earlier model. The square-shaped blacked out headlights now gets more detailing that makes it look futuristic. The grille design has completely revamped with new twin-slat chrome one which is better styled than the previous version. The car also gets chunky scuff plates and heavily brushed silver cladding at the front as well as on the rear that does add to the aggressive SUV credentials.

The most evident change in the side profile is in the form of new black alloys. While the new alloys look plainer, they lend altogether a different appearance when they are in motion. The turn indicators are now an integral part of ORVMs which are electrically foldable. The rear portion is also revised with new S-shaped signature LED making way into the tail lamp cluster. Overall, the changes are subtle but give a youthful touch to the car.

Renault Duster Comfort

Oddly enough, the diesel automatic AMT Duster can be had in the top-spec RxZ variant only whereas the petrol CVT is offered in the RxS variant which is a step down. Naturally, the latter isn’t as well equipped and misses out on some essentials such as climate control and a backup camera. The RxS variant doesn’t get soft touch dash and door pads either. The design and quality of materials remain the same which means you still the odd-numbered speedometer, a large steering wheel and sub-par plastics. Although poor fit and finish was one of the main shortcomings of the original model, Renault improved the quality with the facelift. That said, there is still a low-rent feel to the doors and the centre console surrounds and the overall fit and finish is iffy.

The driving position is mostly car-like, but you do sit up higher than in a hatchback. The A-pillars are slim, helping outward visibility though what’s not so impressive are the wing mirrors which are surprisingly small. As for space and comfort, the Duster CVT petrol is the same and in no way that’s a bad thing. The front seats are just about the right size and offer adequate back and knee support. More importantly, the rear-seat space is also ample with better thigh support than the competition. All in all, the cabin is not as well built as the competition, but there’s no denying that it’s spacious and thoroughly practical.

Renault Duster Gearbox

The 1.5-litre, K9K diesel engine continues its long run of service under this Renault’s bonnet and it’s an adequate if somewhat agricultural performer. What’s entirely new in the powertrain department though is the addition of an automated manual transmission or AMT to the range, and by range, we mean the RxL and RxZ trim. Also, the AMT comes mated to the 110bhp/248Nm, front-wheel drive Duster only.

While we have already seen AMTs do their job in some of the newer small cars, the one in the Duster is a fairly advanced unit and with 6-speeds, it’s also the one with the highest number of gear ratios. Out on the road, however, it works just as good (or bad) as the ones we are familiar with. To start with, the shifts are hardly seamless and the whole car rocks back and forth while shifting cogs – this is particularly evident under full throttle. On part throttle, however, the gear shifts are relatively smoother and one can better things further by going off throttle for a fraction of a second while upshifting. For those looking to take occasional control, there’s a manual mode as well which will only upshift at the screaming end of the powerband. For more information on Renault Duster  visit Iiit-bh

The 1.5-litre, four-cylinder diesel engine, on the other hand, remains the same as before and delivers strong power only above 2,000revs. This means one has to keep the Duster on the boil and that’s important for instances such as darting into traffic gaps just as much as it is overtaking at triple digit speeds. Thankfully, the engine makes up for the lag by offering reasonable grunt throughout the mid-range and the top-end without sounding too coarse.

It’s not just the engine that impresses. The Duster’s impressive road-holding manners have also been carried onto this new model. This means you get the similarly progressive and mid-weighted steering feel that is only a little bit loose on center. Too bad that three-spoke wheel still judders when taking corners over undulations. Renault has certainly worked on reducing the juddering; however, it’s still there and would probably prove to be unnerving for some drivers.

Renault Duster Riding

As for the ride and handling, this petrol version is the same as the rest of the Duster range which is a good thing. The steering feel is light and progressive, only a little loose on-centre. Too bad that three-spoke wheel still judders when taking corners at high speeds. Renault says they have worked on reducing the juddering; however, it’s still there and would probably prove to be unnerving for some drivers. No such groaning when it comes to the ride quality as the Duster simply manages to hover across bad roads. Yes, it is slightly stiffer than its rivals but the trade-off to this is that the Duster feels a lot more solid when going through median bumps and potholes. Unlike some cars wherein you have to take caution while going over rough roads, you really can plough through in the Duster without second thoughts, the whole suspension is that solid. Book Renault Duster  Test drive.

Renault Duster Safety

The braking system installed in the car doesn’t disappoint at all. The bite force instills confidence in the driver. The AWD system itself has immense capabilities to take you through any terrains. Further, in the safety department, Duster has been bestowed with dual airbags, ABS and EBD, ESP, Brake Assist, Hill Start Assist and reverse parking sensors.

Renault Duster Price in Pune

Renault Duster On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 9,54,226 to 15,66,406 for variants Duster RxE Petrol and Duster RxZ 110PS Diesel AWD respectively. Renault Duster is available in 9 variants and 7 colours. Below are details of Renault Duster variants price in Pune. Check for Duster price in Pune at Autozhop.

Renault Duster Bottomline

The Duster CVT petrol, then, is a purposeful looking, no nonsense product with slightly old-school interiors. It’s not the most sophisticated product and with the CVT offered in the mid-spec RxS variant only, not a feature-rich offering either. It is quite likeable though and remains a good performer and at least in the automatic form, less taxing to drive than before. All in all, it is tough and a fairly capable compact SUV, unless in-car tech (Ford EcoSport) or plush ride quality (Tata Nexon) are top priorities.

Renault Duster is available in five different variants such as STD, RXS, RXL, RXZ and RXS CVT. The pricing of the duster has been kept competitive so as to please the buyers against its counterparts. The base model is priced at Rs. 7.95 lakh while the top spec model is available at Rs. 12.79 lakh. The top selling model diesel RXZ AMT is tagged at Rs. 12.33 lakh ex-showroom, New Delhi.

Renault Kwid Facelift Review & Test Drive

Renault Kwid Overview

The Renault Kwid has redefined the entry level car segment altogether. The Renault Kwid 2017 is one of the few cars to take on the Maruti Alto 800 and provide some stiff competition to it. The Kwid is not compromised as much as others in the segment. The Kwid comes with SUV looks, spacious interiors, it is feature loaded and has a big boot. We share our detailed review of the Renault Kwid. For information on contact details of Renault car dealers in Gurgaon

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Renault Kwid Look

There are only two changes on the 1.0-litre Renault Kwid to differentiate it from the 800cc model. The French carmaker has added sporty body graphics on the doors having 1.0-litre stickers and there are a lot better looking full-size ORVMs finished in brushed silver. There is no badging on the tailgate or the front fenders. Apart from these minor changes, the Kwid looks exactly the same. The SUV proportions and high stance is the USP of the Kwid which really makes it stand out of the competition when it comes to styling.

Renault Kwid Space

One step into the Kwid and you already know you are getting into a fairly spacious hatchback by segment standards. The chunky steering wheel is neatly shaped and the Kwid comes with a digital instrument cluster, which is a first for its class. It comes with a elaborate trip computer and fuel economy reading which should help budget car buyers alter their driving style to eke out more efficiency.

The quality of plastics for a car of its price is quite good except for places like the door handles and aircon controls but overall the Kwid doesn’t look like it’s built cheap. There are plenty of storage spaces in the Kwid – two glove boxes, the top one with a bottle holder, two bottle holders in the front door pockets and plenty of scooped up places in the dashboard and in front of the gear lever. The seats are of the foamy, cushiony kind, and well contoured for the front passengers. The headrest is integrated and there’s decent under thigh support. It’s a spacious entry level hatchback, and in terms of boot space, it’s better than a few cars above the segment as well. At 300 litres, you can carry a big suitcase and an overnighter comfortably.

The Kwid has the longest wheelbase in its class at 2423mm, about 60mm more than the Alto and 40mm more than the Eon. It is also much wider than its closest competition and so you get more legroom and shoulder room. The Kwid’s packaging is seriously impressive.

Renault Kwid Gearbox

The 1.0-litre Renault Kwid produces 67 BHP at 5500 RPM and 91 Nm at 4250 RPM. This basically means 14 BHP and 19 Nm more at lower RPMs when compared to the 800cc engine. The added capacity and retuned engine offers strong low end and mid-range punch. The 3-cylinder engine doesn’t feel strained now and easily picks up the pace without letting you put effort. In-gear acceleration is better now and you don’t need to shift more frequently while driving in city traffic. The 5-speed transmission still feels a bit sluggish to use but has well defined gates.

100 km/hr comes up quickly if you upshift a tad before the redline since it doesn’t feel too responsive at the higher end of the rev band. Renault has worked on the NVH levels, which makes it less noisy and it feels more refined now. The more powerful Kwid now feels at home on the highways since you can cruise around 100 km/hr with ease at lower RPMs. The claimed fuel efficiency has gone down a bit to 23.01 km/l since there is a bigger engine under the hood.

Renault Kwid Rideing

It is a Renault at the end of the day and this is felt with the way the Kwid handles. There is a slight roll felt around corners at high speeds but the entire setup does a great job of maintaining its straight stance. Renault rightly claims that the Kwid mimics the Duster by offering similar level of driving dynamics, which has to be its salient feature. To make sure there isn’t much of drama when it comes to bringing the vehicle to a complete halt, it gets disc brakes in front and drum on the rear. Since there is no ABS offered for now, the tiny rubbers screech to glory during abrupt braking. We wish the brakes to be tad more effective. Overall, it leaves an amazing impression and is undoubtedly the best city car to drive in its segment.

Renault Kwid Cost in Hyderabad

Renault Kwid Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 2,68,463/- (Kwid STD) to 4,66,299/- (Kwid RXT 1.0 O Superhero Edition AMT). Get best offers for Renault Kwid from Renault Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Kwid price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Renault Kwid Conclusion

If it is your first car, and you haven’t experienced a torque converter or dual clutch automatic before, the Kwid AMT will prove both easy to drive and agreeable to own. The gearshifts aren’t jerky, the throttle is linear and responsive, and thanks to the 1-litre engine, it is also energetic to drive in the city. We haven’t tested it for fuel economy yet, but we expect it to return efficiency figures matching the manual Kwid 1.0. What’s more, it carries over the highlights of the Kwid: a light steering, a plush low speed ride and clear visibility.