Honda City Engine & Transmission

Honda City Overview

Honda was among the several foreign manufacturers to make inroads in India towards the end of 1990s. And while the Japanese auto giant has rolled out several models all this time, Honda City sedan been the most successful car which was first introduced in 1998. Honda had launched new-generation City in 2014, which was followed by a facelift in 2017. Like the previous models, the City facelift is among the top-selling mid-sized sedan in the country. The new Honda City 2019 carline is currently available in both petrol and diesel engine options in manual and CVT variants priced in the range of Rs 9.70 lakh to Rs 14.05 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi). View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

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Honda City Look

In the visual department, the Honda City 2017 has surely upped its ante with all the modifications that have been done to it. The front profile has been completely revamped and now gets a much sharper look than before. There are new LED headlamps, LED DRLs, LED fog-lamps, a restyled grille with a thick chrome fixture along with a sharp bumper which sums up the facelift look.

Towards the side, the New City gets new 16-inch alloy wheels which now come with wider tyres. Towards the back, Honda’s designers have kept the changes to the minimum with the rear-profile only getting a minor bumper tweak, which is a honey comb design in its middle along with the incorporation of a boot-lid mounted spoiler for the higher variants. All in all the makeover done in the cosmetic department has indeed made the 2017 Honda City now look a lot more contemporary and stylish while at the same time accentuating its appeal in the premium part of the spectrum.

Honda City Comfort

The Honda City has always had one of the most stylish cabin designs among its competitors. With the generation update, expect this car to get an equally appealing design. That said, Honda will for sure add a premium touch to the interiors, for City being an executive sedan. Consequently, expect it to come with a dual tone cabin colour scheme of black and beige.

Cabin space has always been one of the major strong points of the City. The next-generation model is likely to use an all-new platform. This could translate into improved cabin space. Honda is currently working on re-establishing itself as the manufacturer of premium cars. Hence, we are expecting the Honda City 2020 to have good material quality on the inside.

Honda City Gearbox

The 2019 Honda City line-up is available in both petrol and diesel engines. The petrol version is powered by a tried & tested 1.5-litre, 4-cylinder i-VTEC unit that produces 118bhp of power at 6,600rpm and 145Nm torque at 4,600rpm. The diesel City gets Honda’s 1.5-litre, 4-cylinder i-DTEC oil burner that makes 99bhp at 3,600rpm against 200Nm torque at 1,750rpm. Transmission options include a conventional 5-speed manual unit, a 6-speed manual gearbox and a CVT that is available only on select petrol variants. Suspension set-up comprises McPherson Strut with coil spring and Torsion Beam with coil spring at front and rear respectively.Check for Honda City in iiitdm.in

Featuring the same engines used in the pre-facelift model, there is no significant change in performance. However, the NVH levels have improved though noise still seeps inside the cabin, hence there is some room for improvement. The low-end power delivery on the diesel engine makes it suitable for city driving. The road grip has also been improved courtesy new 16-inch tyres. The next-gen City will receive BSVI compliant engines, which will offer better NVH levels and performance.Powered by Honda’s 1.5-litre i-VTEC engine, the petrol City is rated at 17.4km/l in manual version opposed to 18km/l in CVT option. Diesel City is claimed to return excellent mileage compared to its petrol counterpart with 25.6km/l of ARAI rated fuel economy.

Honda City Rideing

The specifications of Honda City are so configured that the car offers a wonderful and pleasant drive on both city roads as well as the expressway. The petrol car is powerful for you to cruise at high speeds while the diesel version has a much-needed grunt that gets the accelerator pedal to be highly responsive. The sedan can be powered to a top speed of well over the 160 km/hour mark and can do the 0-100 km/hour round in just a 10 seconds. The radial tubeless tyres provides ample road grip and stability. It is suspended over MacPherson Strut for the front wheel and Torsion Beam for the rear.

Honda City Safety

Since new safety regulations come in effect starting April 1st 2019 and the estimated launch timeline for the new City is around December the same year, it becomes obvious to believe that it will get several safety features as standard and then some more. Standard safety kit is going to include dual front airbags, ABS with EBD, ISOFIX child seat anchorage and rear parking sensors.In addition to this, range-topping models can come with additional safety kit such as side, knee and curtain airbags, traction control, electronic stability program among other electronic driver aids.Dual Front Airbags.Side And Curtain Airbags.Reverse Parking Sensors.ISOFIX Child Seat Mounts.Traction Control.Electronic Stability Program

Honda City Price in Hyderabad

Honda City Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 8,75,617/- (City S MT Petrol) to 14,08,021/- (City Zx MT Diesel Anniversary Edition). Get best offers for Honda City from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for City price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda City Bottomline

The new Honda City 2019 looks sportier and receives new elements inspired by Civic. Most of the changes on the outside are made to the front that injects aggression to the face. Interiors too get updates for a more upmarket look. The material quality has improved, and it packs in additional kit including some of the segment first features. On the safety front, the 2019 Honda City features standard dual front airbags, ABS with EBD and ISOFIX child seats. Although, Honda claims to rework the NVH levels, but there is still room for improvement.

Honda WR V Facelift Review & Transmission

Honda WR V Overview

Honda unveiled the WR-V Crossover last year in Brazil. The compact SUV made its world premiere at the Sao Paulo International Motor Show 2016 which commenced from the second week of November.We all know the demand for Crossovers and SUV’s in the Indian market and the compact SUV segment is flooded with many brand new products. So it was quite obvious that Honda would have introduced this new Crossover too in the Indian market as well after its launch in the markets of Brazil and some other countries in South America.The car was also caught a couple of times testing on the road with full camouflage. For all your information this newest Crossover WR-V is based on the Jazz hatchback platform and is the same car under the hood. It will make it to the Indian market as well to take on some other sub-compact Crossovers. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in India at Autozhop

Honda WR V Design & Style

Unlike some other Cross hatchbacks of its segment, the Honda WR-V gets some significant updates which has helped it get an entirely new identity. Towards the front, the WR-V features a raised bonnet while the thick chrome grille somehow reminds us of the new City. Besides the revised hood and grille the headlamp cluster too has been redesigned as well and also gets integrated LED daytime running lamps. To make the Crossover slightly beefier the WRV also features a sculpted bumper which also houses round shaped fog lamps. There are also silver finished scuff plates. Just like the front profiles the side profile too features larger 16-inch wheels wrapped with 195/60 profile tyres. Just like the front and side profile the rear profile too has been heavily modified as well as it gets different appearing L-shaped taillamps. The rear bumper too has been amended as well along with new bumpers and slightly modified tailgate.

Honda WR V Cabin & Comfort

The WR-V is a bigger machine than the Jazz, but it’s still under 4 metres long. So the space would be just about enough, right? Well, no. The sense of space could obliterate claustrophobia as a concept. While you won’t have that commanding/SUV-esque driving position, you do get the sense you’re sitting in a car that’s longer than 4 metres. That segment-first sunroof just adds to the airy feel. Seating five-up is easy but the middle occupant will want for more shoulder room. Also, the lack of adjustable headrests is just ridiculous and the integrated ones are too small and soft. The seat cushioning is a tad too soft, especially for long jaunts and considering this car’s positioning as something for explorers. After all, unlike the Jazz, this does get cruise control. Heck, you even get a 363-litre boot that’ll accommodate the average adult comfortably (kidnappers/Omni owners please note).

You also get nice touches like a steering that’s adjustable for rake and reach, and a can-holder in front of the driver’s AC vent. Also, modern cars have A-pillars that’re thicker than the US president, so the WR-V’s little quarter glass comes in handy at intersections. Somehow, the quality benchmark is similar for the tech and trim – just enough. There are hard plastics all-round, but nothing you’d call cheap. There’s no leather this or soft-touch that, but the upholstery is of a decent grade. The 7-inch infotainment system has a simple UI and a decent list of connectivity options including MirrorLink and WiFi, which is great. However, the system’s inherent lagginess is annoying and ever present. Moreover, the setup looks like an aftermarket add on. Also, the lack of Android Auto or Apple CarPlay can’t be ignored when there’re cheaper cars that get both. Lastly, the air-con may have a cool touch-panel but using it on the move isn’t all that convenient. You do have to take your eyes off the road to operate it and even the cooling was weak in our 40-degrees Celsius test conditions, which also draws your attention to the missing rear AC vents.

Honda WR V engine & Transmission

As expected, the WR-V gets the same engines as the Jazz. That means a SOHC 1.2-litre i-VTEC petrol that produces 90PS at 6,000rpm and 110Nm at 4,800rpm as well as a DOHC 1.5-litre I-DTEC turbo-diesel that puts out 100PS at 3,600rpm and 200Nm at 1,750rpm. The diesel gets a 6-speed manual and the petrol gets a 5-speed manual – however, there is no CVT option like in the Jazz.The diesel engine has got good low-end grunt and with a responsive throttle, it will happily trudge along at 25kmph in third gear. The engine is quite free-revving and the linear power delivery makes the car quite enjoyable, if not exciting, to drive around. The gearbox is typically Honda with a precise ‘click-click’ when you shift gears, while the light and progressive clutch is nice to use in stop-and-go traffic.

Additionally, the 6-speed makes the WR-V a comfortable and effortless highway cruiser. While Honda didn’t give us any figures, they are claiming best-in-class acceleration figures. They are also claiming that the WR-V diesel will offer segment-leading efficiency with a figure of 25.5kmpl. This is 1.8kmpl less than what they claim for the Jazz. Apart from the extra 50kg that the WR-V carries, this could also be down to the gearing which, Honda says, has been optimised for better acceleration. But we’ll have to wait for the road test to get real-world figures.What is obvious is that the engine is still as loud as it has always been. NVH levels are quite poor in the cabin and that’s personally quite off-putting.

On the contrary, the 1.2-litre petrol engine is super refined and creamy. It’s very quiet till around 4,000rpm at which point the sound turns to a nice raspy note which gets louder as you get to the redline. That said, the sound is the only exciting thing about it. The engine feels annoyingly underpowered and you really have to rev the nuts off of it for some decent acceleration and that can get quite annoying especially during overtakes. This, despite Honda saying that they reworked the gearing for better acceleration. That said, it shouldn’t be too much of a problem within the city. The precise gearbox and the light clutch only make the experience that much nicer in slow-moving traffic. Honda is claiming that the petrol WR-V will return an overall average of 17.5kmpl which is quite respectable.

Honda WR V Driving dynamics

The most significant mechanical update in the Honda WR-V is the suspension. The new set-up and the larger tyres raise the ground clearance to 188mm from the Jazz’s 165mm. Ride quality certainly feels more supple than the Jazz, and it absorbs potholes quite well without any thuds. That’s also got to do with the larger-profile tyres. Damping is neither too soft nor too firm, so the car doesn’t feel bouncy or jumpy over undulations.But around the bends, the car does tend to roll a little when you start to push it. However, at normal driving speeds, the Honda WR-V feels safe and confident. For reference, it feels around 30 per cent less stiff than Maruti’s Vitara Brezza and therefore a little less nimble too. The electric steering offers good feedback but feels quite vague. But it’s neither too light nor too heavy and weighs up well at higher speeds.

Honda WR V Safety & Braking

All variants of the Honda WR-V get dual front airbags and ABS with EBD as standard. It also gets a rear camera with multiple viewing angles, but like the City and Jazz, you don’t get rear parking sensors.

Honda WR V Price in Hyderabad

Honda Wrv Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,77,365/- (WRV S MT Petrol) to 10,16,063/- (WRV VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Wrv from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for WR V price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda WR V Verdict

… if you are looking at getting yourself a Jazz, the WR-V deserves a closer look. It is definitely better suited to tackle our roads, and as such is more versatile than the Jazz. Just don’t expect the WR-V to tackle any serious mud plugging. However, the WR-V does offer more in terms of appeal and equipment. We expect the WR-V to be priced Rs 70,000 – Rs 1,00,000 over the Jazz, and that would well justify the extra kit and attitude that the WR-V has to offer. However, when compared to the more square and upright compact-SUVs in the market today, the WR-V’s appeal seems to dim. And, when you factor in the expected price, Honda’s WR-V ends up feeling like a bit of a hard sell.