Renault Captur First Drive Review

Renault Captur

Renault Captur Overview

Renault India may be a relatively young brand but because of well thought-out mass market products like the Duster and the Kwid doing well, they have managed to roll on the right path and gain a respectable market share. While the Kwid continues to sell in strong numbers, keeping Renault India in the small car game, the brand is struggling in the crossover space, what with the Duster feeling the heat from newer rivals. Enter the Captur, an all-new offering which represents a paradigm shift in crossover design for Renault. Unlike the Duster which follows the traditional boxy ethos of an SUV as we know it, the Captur is more streamlined and its design carries a lot more flair.

Anticipation is high, then, and the style-heavy Captur needs to punch above its weight to do well in the premium crossover segment which includes the hot selling Hyundai Creta and the impressive Jeep Compass.

Renault Captur Look

The Renault Captur 2017 is based on the same platform on which the Duster is made. However, both Renault Captur and Duster have nothing in common when it comes to exterior design, style and overall looks. Renault Captur seems inspired from European design language with curves, swooped lines and a trendy appearance, which will be liked by people of all ages.

On its front, the Captur boasts a small yet muscular bonnet diving down at the front between well-designed chrome grille and good-looking headlight assembly. The front bumper with integrated C-shaped LED daytime running lamps and fog lamps gels very well with the design language. On its side profile, the 17-inch ‘crystal cut’ wheels look simply superb. The rear has a clean and refreshing design, which goes very well with trendiness of Renault Captur car.

Renault Captur Comfort

Is it familiar? Yes, it’s easy to spot bits that are from Renault’s parts bin, such as the AC vents, climate control console and infotainment screen. However, that’s not to say the Captur doesn’t offer something unique. The auto AC console may be similar but gets rubberized dials to add a degree of tactility. The plastics are still hard to touch but are far better than what we’ve seen in the Duster. That said, they just fall short of being called ‘premium’. The glovebox cover in particular, feels very flimsy and makes you wonder if one hard enough pothole will make it come loose. For more information on Renault Captur  visit Iiit-bh

You do need to give the Captur’s interior more time to make its first impression, but once you spend enough time in it, it’s easy to appreciate the upmarket bits. The white and gold faux leather-draped ergo-design seats reek of quality, with the diamond quilting adding a touch of German car finesse. The leather makes its way onto the door pads and centre armrest too, which lifts up the experience a few notches. The seats, front or rear, aren’t just eye candy either. They really are supportive, even of larger frames, and will be very handy on long distance drives.

The driving position, though, is a mixed bag. The panoramic design means you have a great view of the road ahead, aided by the relatively slim A-pillar, which makes visibility at T-junctions more convenient. You also get a commanding drive position, with the bonnet falling into view even with the seat set to its lowest. However, that’s where the problem lies. The default seat height is far too high, so even drivers just under 6ft in height will find the roof a bit close for comfort, while tall drivers will feel cramped. This isn’t an issue in the Duster. We also wish telescopic steering adjustment was offered, instead of the current tilt-only setup.

The ergonomics aren’t as fluid as what you’d see in a Maruti or Hyundai either. You do get an eco-drive mode and cruise control but the buttons are placed at your right knee, which isn’t where you’d expect them to be. Even the front cupholders are placed just ahead of the gearlever, so engage an odd gear and accessing anything kept here will be tricky. But then, you start appreciating some quirks, like the Duster-spec infotainment controls that sit behind the steering wheel, which you quickly start appreciating over traditional steering-mounted controls. You even get a pretty large, closed storage spot atop the dashboard, which could come in handy to slot your phone into while using navigation, provided you use an anti-slip mat.

Finally, the space has been better used than in the Duster, even though both cars share their 2673mm wheelbase. It helps free up a little more knee room in both seat rows and while headroom is underserved for taller folks up front, the rear seat didn’t have the same issue. It can also seat 3 at the rear quite well, even with the rear AC vents console. For added convenience, there’s an armrest in between for when you’re travelling four-up. However, ingress/egress in the rear is a pain point. The B-pillar is intrusive and constricts the passage way. Senior citizens will like the tall seat, but swinging their legs in will require some effort from the thighs, as they’ll have to avoid hitting the pillar with their feet. Check for car loan interest calculator.

The boot’s plenty accommodating at 392 litres, with no intrusive bulges or plus-sized loading lip to spoil the fun. The rear seat does fold down and helps make room for a lot of luggage, but doesn’t split 60:40, nor does it drop flat.

Renault Captur Gearbox

On the road, the Captur could be best described as ‘comfortable’. More on that later… Now we ought to make it clear that the India-spec Captur is quite different from the one sold in the Europe. The Captur that we will be getting is based on Renault’s MO platform for emerging markets, which is why the brand has stuck with the tried and tested 1.5-litre K9K diesel motor. That being said, there is a vast difference in the way the Captur and the Duster behave on the road.

The Captur and the Duster share the same 1.5-litre 110bhp/240Nm diesel motor, however, the refinement levels are world apart. The Captur is significantly quieter on the move thanks to better insulation and a less noisy motor – one can hardly hear the diesel clatter once the windows are up. What’s more, the Captur also accelerates in a more linear manner than the Duster when the motor is on boost. For those who are wondering, there is still some turbo lag under 2,000rpm, post which the Captur pulls strongly till 4,500rpm or thereabout. The motor’s got enough torque lower down the rev range to propel the Captur through traffic without ever feeling like it needs to be worked too hard. To our surprise, even the clutch feel is different compared to the Duster – it’s more precise and not as heavy either.

Like the Duster, the Captur simply devours bad roads and manages to hover across giant potholes without unsettling itself. Yes, it is slightly stiff when compared to the Duster but the trade-off to this is better high speed poise when driving over undulated roads. Perhaps the most impressive bit is the way it rebounds quickly from any sharp bump you might encounter, regaining composure almost immediately. The only minor downside though, is the amount of noise that filters into the cabin. Over coarse-chip surfaces the interior plastics rattle a little too much and overall there’s some noticeable wind noise, too.

Renault Captur Riding

The ride, like the Duster’s, is a strong point. The Captur’s ground clearance means bad roads leave no scraping scares and even on really bad patches, it still pummels through everything, letting very little seep into the cabin. It is noticeably stiffer than the Duster, so you don’t get the exact same sense of indestructibility but it balances the marginal loss with better stability. Even though the Renault Captur sits tall, body roll is managed well and it doesn’t feel top heavy, even through sharp corners. Book Renault Captur Test Drive.

Driver’s car then? Well, no. The chassis is set up well but the steering is a little too heavy and while it is fairly responsive, there is no feel or feedback. Charge at a sharp turn and you feel unsure of where the tyres are facing. Like the Duster, the steering also has kickback through hard turns, albeit to a milder degree.

Renault Captur Safety

The list of Renault Captur safety features include Front Disc Brakes, Drum on Rear, ABS with EBD, Rear Parking Sensors, Central Locking, Driver & Passenger Airbags, Crash Sensors, Rear Seat Belts, Seat Belt Warning, Power Door Lock, Child Safety Locks, Side & Front Impact Beams, Passenger Side Rear View Mirror, Rear Camera, Centrally Mounted Fuel Tank, Engine Immobilizer, Automatic Headlamps, Follow Me Home Headlamps and ISOFIX Child Seat.

Renault Captur Price in Pune

Renault Captur On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 11,86,647 to 16,92,512 for variants Captur RXE Petrol and Captur Platine Mono Diesel respectively. Renault Captur is available in 10 variants and 5 colours. Below are details of Renault Captur variants price in Pune. Check for Renault Captur price in Pune at Autozhop.

Renault Captur Bottomline

Put simply, the Captur is an interesting car. At first, it looks like a generic crossover but as you get closer its European design elements stand out and you realise that there is nothing quite like it in this segment – both the Creta and the Compass carry traditional crossover design cues.

The real question here, though, is whether the Captur advances the crossover game forward for Renault. It’s certainly improved over the Duster in many key areas including engine refinement, gearshift quality, cabin ergonomics and ride quality. However, it trails behind its rivals when it comes to interior quality and drivetrain options. Renault, then, have got to play their pricing card right to regain some momentum in the crossover segment. We expect the top-spec Kaptur to come in at a premium of around Rs 1 lakh over the Duster 110PS RxZ.

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