BMW X6 Facelift Review, Performance & First Drive

BMW X6 Overview

Infused with revisions, the generation BMW X6 SUV gets bigger bragging a relatively macho stance. Although, the wheelbase has been reduced minimally by 2 mm to 1,933 mm which means an insignificantly shorter cabin. Other than the metamorphosed size, X6 gets better styled exteriors and spruced up cabin. Available only in the xDrive40d grade, the M package is offered as standard fare. Cosmetic upgrades on the outside and inside make the SUV look changed for good.BMW has also inset some advanced gadgets inside for the purpose of occupants’ entertainment. Safety wise, this Beemer is a reliable one, courtesy the raft of safety equipments incorporated inside. Mechanical strength is derived from the athletic 3.0 litre, diesel powertrain which outputs healthy power and torque figures. Performance is yet another area to watch out for, the company claimed performance numbers for the SUV are impressive. BMW price in India is placed a little higher, which brings it along the lines of priciest SUVs on offer. Get details on city specific BMW X6 price and accessories on offer at the nearest BMW X6 dealer. For information on contact details of BMW car dealers in Mumbai

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BMW X6 Look

The external appearance of this second generation BMW X6 explains that it has retained the same body structure from its predecessor. However, it gets much bolder and aggressive in its design that certainly lures the auto enthusiasts. The front facade is fitted with a slightly pronounced kidney bean shaped grille, which is designed with vertical slats and thick chrome surround. This is complimented by the bold lines on the bonnet. The headlight cluster gets a bit sleek and is housed with LED headlights featuring high beam assistance. The bumpers have been redesigned to give a masculine look to the frontage. It has a nudge guard sort of arrangement featuring air inlets. It also has round shaped fog lamps along with chrome accents that renders it a premium appeal. From the side facet, it looks more like a crossover and a coupe. It gets all the styling aspects like a set of alloy wheels, body colored ORVMs including door handles and black B pillars. The rear end gives you a glimpse of a sedan, thanks to its boot lid. The tail light cluster is powered by LED brake lights and turn indicators that further adds to its elegance. The rear bumper is in body color, but it seems to be assembled with some sort of a ceramic look-alike material that connects both the exhaust pipes. Overall, this second generation X6 looks refreshing and it will certainly lure the automobile enthusiasts.

BMW X6 Space

Step inside and you are welcomed by a trademark BMW cabin. The dashboard has horizontally been split into three parts. The upper half is black leather wrapped, the lower half gets an off-white treatment and splitting the two are slats of piano black and wood. The interior and the door trims are also optionally available in American Oak, Fineline Stripe, Fineline Pure, or Poplar Grain fine-wood trim fine-wood trim. The off-white materials used in the cabin gives it an airy feel. The seats can be adjusted electronically making it easy to find the right driving position and comfort. There is a fair bit of space at the back too but due to the centre arm rest and the air con controls, seating three at the back won’t be the most comfortable affair. Surprisingly, despite the coupe roofline, the low seating means there is quite a bit of head room even at the back. For those planning to go on a long family vacation need not worry about boot space. With the seat back upright the 2015 X6 makes 580 litres of space. Moreover the rear seat can be folded down in a 40:20:40 split thereby expanding on storage space.

The 2015 X6 comes heavily loaded with features. From Head-Up Display, night vision with dynamic light spot, 360 degree camera to parking assist, the X6 has it all. In terms of safety, the X6 gets 6 airbags, ABS, EBD and all other abbreviations you can think of. It also gets Lane departure warning and pedestrian alert. For the passengers at the back there are two separate HD 9.2-inch monitors with separate DVD drives to view different films on. Talking about movies and sound, the 2015 BMW X6 also comes with a 16 speaker Bang and Olufsen high end surround sound system.The centre console gets a 10.25-inch screen below which is the dual zone climate control and the controls for the integrated Bang and Olufsen infotainment system. Aside from the media and navigation, the screen also displays vehicle information and settings too. All the buttons are soft touch and well within reach. And then there is the automatic tailgate operation. If you hands are full after a shopping spree, a quick wave of the foot under the rear bumper opens up the tailgate.

BMW X6 Performance

Under the hood sits BMW’s most recent gem — a smooth, free-revving diesel six with not one, not two, but three turbos! The M50d’s 3.0-litre, triple-turbo straight-six produces 381bhp and commercial vehicle-like torque of 75.45kgm. All this is achieved because BMW has reduced the compression ratio of this diesel to just 16:1, really low considering few petrols nowadays come with a 12:1 ratio. The lower compression allows for greater ‘fill’ from the three turbos at maximum boost, and BMW has made sure injection pressure is good enough to supply plenty of diesel. The M50d’s injection pressure is upped to a really high 2,200bar when the engine is running at max speed.

How do the three turbos work together? To begin with, a small variable-geometry turbo comes in at low revs. This allows for fast responses and a reduction in lag as the light turbo is easy to spool up even with a small tap on the throttle. There is a hint of lag as you take off, but the quick eight-speed gearbox ratios help you overcome this in a jiffy. The larger main turbo joins the fray at just 1,500rpm, and takes responsibility for most of the meaty midrange. So, after 2,000rpm, responses are massive and explosive bursts of acceleration are just a flex of your right foot away. The third turbo is small again and chimes in at approximately 2,600rpm, helping give the mid range a boost. The best bit is that the turbos overlap so smoothly, you really need to pay attention to notice where each comes in, especially if you accelerate flat out in one long seamless pull all the way to 5,600rpm.

As a result, the X6 M50d is really quick. This 2.2-tonne SUV does 0-100 in an insane 5.3 seconds, and that’s just the start of it. And the manic pull in the higher gears simply has to be experienced. The motor delivers huge thrust from 2,000rpm to 5,000rpm, and the manner in which it progresses up the powerband is so undiesel-like, you almost forget it is one. Yes, it growls like a diesel in the midrange under load and there’s a hint of clatter too, but there’s also a nice snarl in the top end that sounds just great. At speed, the X6’s most remarkable feature is its near-petrol-like hush.

BMW X6 Driving

Hit the road in the 2017 BMW X6 and the first thing you’ll notice is the authoritative acceleration provided by the 35i’s 300-horsepower six-cylinder engine. This engine also feels refined throughout its rev range and is nicely complemented by the smooth-shifting eight-speed automatic transmission.If it’s more thrust you’re after, the xDrive50i model’s 445-hp V8 should prove sufficiently satisfying, although it comes at a hefty price premium. This engine provides all the performance most people could ever want, along with an exhilarating exhaust note when pushed hard. Best of all, its prodigious power output is balanced with a level of refinement that the hyperactive high-performance BMW X6 M sorely lacks.

The X6’s standard suspension produces an unruffled ride quality even over bad pavement. Dialing up the Comfort mode with the adjustable suspension produces a similar result. Switching the adjustable suspension to the firmer Sport mode improves handling thanks to firmer body control, though there’s no escaping the fact that this is a large, heavy vehicle with a higher center of gravity than your average sport sedan. The steering feels precise but doesn’t offer as much feedback as in competitors such as the Porsche Cayenne.

BMW X6 Safety

The 2017 X6 comes heavily loaded with features. From Head-Up Display, night vision with dynamic light spot, 360 degree camera to parking assist, the X6 has it all. In terms of safety, the X6 gets 6 airbags, ABS, EBD and all other abbreviations you can think of. It also gets Lane departure warning and pedestrian alert. For the passengers at the back there are two separate HD 9.2-inch monitors with separate DVD drives to view different films on. Talking about movies and sound, the 2015 BMW X6 also comes with a 16 speaker Bang and Olufsen high end surround sound system.The centre console gets a 10.25-inch screen below which is the dual zone climate control and the controls for the integrated Bang and Olufsen infotainment system. Aside from the media and navigation, the screen also displays vehicle information and settings too. All the buttons are soft touch and well within reach. And then there is the automatic tailgate operation. If you hands are full after a shopping spree, a quick wave of the foot under the rear bumper opens up the tailgate.

BMW X6 Cost in Hyderabad

Bmw X6 Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 94,15,000/- (X6 xDrive 35i M Sport) to 1,82,40,000/- (X6 M STD). Get best offers for Bmw X6 from Bmw Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for BMW X6 price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

BMW X6 Bottomline

The BMW X6 might loose out on headroom and boot space against the X5, but it offers an unparalleled level of desirability. While it sure is expensive, it’s a very different and unique body style which is attracting many people to the vehicle. The X6 has carved out such a niche that others are now following with their own offerings (Mercedes and Audi). If you want an SUV which drives well, performs brilliantly and looks out of this world, then the BMW X6 is your only choice today.

Renault Kwid Facelift Review & Test Drive

Renault Kwid Overview

The Renault Kwid has redefined the entry level car segment altogether. The Renault Kwid 2017 is one of the few cars to take on the Maruti Alto 800 and provide some stiff competition to it. The Kwid is not compromised as much as others in the segment. The Kwid comes with SUV looks, spacious interiors, it is feature loaded and has a big boot. We share our detailed review of the Renault Kwid. For information on contact details of Renault car dealers in Gurgaon

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Renault Kwid Look

There are only two changes on the 1.0-litre Renault Kwid to differentiate it from the 800cc model. The French carmaker has added sporty body graphics on the doors having 1.0-litre stickers and there are a lot better looking full-size ORVMs finished in brushed silver. There is no badging on the tailgate or the front fenders. Apart from these minor changes, the Kwid looks exactly the same. The SUV proportions and high stance is the USP of the Kwid which really makes it stand out of the competition when it comes to styling.

Renault Kwid Space

One step into the Kwid and you already know you are getting into a fairly spacious hatchback by segment standards. The chunky steering wheel is neatly shaped and the Kwid comes with a digital instrument cluster, which is a first for its class. It comes with a elaborate trip computer and fuel economy reading which should help budget car buyers alter their driving style to eke out more efficiency.

The quality of plastics for a car of its price is quite good except for places like the door handles and aircon controls but overall the Kwid doesn’t look like it’s built cheap. There are plenty of storage spaces in the Kwid – two glove boxes, the top one with a bottle holder, two bottle holders in the front door pockets and plenty of scooped up places in the dashboard and in front of the gear lever. The seats are of the foamy, cushiony kind, and well contoured for the front passengers. The headrest is integrated and there’s decent under thigh support. It’s a spacious entry level hatchback, and in terms of boot space, it’s better than a few cars above the segment as well. At 300 litres, you can carry a big suitcase and an overnighter comfortably.

The Kwid has the longest wheelbase in its class at 2423mm, about 60mm more than the Alto and 40mm more than the Eon. It is also much wider than its closest competition and so you get more legroom and shoulder room. The Kwid’s packaging is seriously impressive.

Renault Kwid Gearbox

The 1.0-litre Renault Kwid produces 67 BHP at 5500 RPM and 91 Nm at 4250 RPM. This basically means 14 BHP and 19 Nm more at lower RPMs when compared to the 800cc engine. The added capacity and retuned engine offers strong low end and mid-range punch. The 3-cylinder engine doesn’t feel strained now and easily picks up the pace without letting you put effort. In-gear acceleration is better now and you don’t need to shift more frequently while driving in city traffic. The 5-speed transmission still feels a bit sluggish to use but has well defined gates.

100 km/hr comes up quickly if you upshift a tad before the redline since it doesn’t feel too responsive at the higher end of the rev band. Renault has worked on the NVH levels, which makes it less noisy and it feels more refined now. The more powerful Kwid now feels at home on the highways since you can cruise around 100 km/hr with ease at lower RPMs. The claimed fuel efficiency has gone down a bit to 23.01 km/l since there is a bigger engine under the hood.

Renault Kwid Rideing

It is a Renault at the end of the day and this is felt with the way the Kwid handles. There is a slight roll felt around corners at high speeds but the entire setup does a great job of maintaining its straight stance. Renault rightly claims that the Kwid mimics the Duster by offering similar level of driving dynamics, which has to be its salient feature. To make sure there isn’t much of drama when it comes to bringing the vehicle to a complete halt, it gets disc brakes in front and drum on the rear. Since there is no ABS offered for now, the tiny rubbers screech to glory during abrupt braking. We wish the brakes to be tad more effective. Overall, it leaves an amazing impression and is undoubtedly the best city car to drive in its segment.

Renault Kwid Cost in Hyderabad

Renault Kwid Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 2,68,463/- (Kwid STD) to 4,66,299/- (Kwid RXT 1.0 O Superhero Edition AMT). Get best offers for Renault Kwid from Renault Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Kwid price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Renault Kwid Conclusion

If it is your first car, and you haven’t experienced a torque converter or dual clutch automatic before, the Kwid AMT will prove both easy to drive and agreeable to own. The gearshifts aren’t jerky, the throttle is linear and responsive, and thanks to the 1-litre engine, it is also energetic to drive in the city. We haven’t tested it for fuel economy yet, but we expect it to return efficiency figures matching the manual Kwid 1.0. What’s more, it carries over the highlights of the Kwid: a light steering, a plush low speed ride and clear visibility.

JavaScript Start-up Performance

As web developers, we know how easy it is to end up with web page bloat. But loading a webpage is much more than shipping bytes down the wire. Once the browser has downloaded our page’s scripts it then has to parse, interpret & run them. In this post, we’ll dive into this phase for JavaScript, why it might be slowing down your app’s start-up & how you can fix it.

Historically, we just haven’t spent a lot of time optimizing for the JavaScript Parse/Compile step. We almost expect scripts to be immediately parsed and executed as soon as the parser hits a <script> tag. But this isn’t quite the case. Here’s a simplified breakdown of how V8 works:

A simplified view of how V8 works. This is our idealized pipeline that we’re working towards.

Let’s focus on some of the main phases.

What slows our web apps from booting up?

Parsing, Compiling and Executing scripts are things a JavaScript engine spends significant time in during start-up. This matters as if it takes a while, it can delay how soon users can interact with our site. Imagine if they can see a button but not click or touch it for multiple seconds. This can degrade the user experience.

Parse & Compile times for a popular website using V8’s Runtime Call Stats in Chrome Canary. Notice how a slow Parse/Compile on desktop can take far longer on average mobile phones.

Start-up times matter for performance-sensitive code. In fact, V8 – Chrome’s JavaScript engine, spends a large amount of time parsing and compiling scripts on top sites like Facebook, Wikipedia and Reddit:

The pink area (JavaScript) represents time spent in V8 and Blink’s C++, while the orange and yellow represent parse and compile.

Parse and Compile have also been highlighted as a bottleneck by a number of large sites & frameworks you may be using. Below are tweets from Facebook’s Sebastian Markbage and Google’s Rob Wormald:

Sam Saccone calls out the cost of JS parse in ‘Planning for Performance’

As we move to an increasingly mobile world, it’s important that we understand the time spent in Parse/Compile can often be 2–5x as long on phones as on desktop. Higher-end phones (e.g the iPhone or Pixel) will perform very differently to a Moto G4. This highlights the importance of us testing on representative hardware (not just high-end!) so our users’ experiences don’t suffer.

Parse times for a 1MB bundle of JavaScript across desktop & mobile devices of differing classes. Notice how close a high-end phone like an iPhone 7 is to perf on a Macbook Pro vs the performance as we go down the graph towards average mobile hardware.

If we’re shipping huge bundles for our app, this is where endorsing modern bundling techniques like code-splitting, tree-shaking and Service Worker caching can really make a huge difference. That said, even a small bundle, written poorly or with poor library choices can result in the main thread being pegged for a long time in compilation or function call times. It’s important to holistically measure and understand where our real bottlenecks are.

What Are JavaScript Parse & Compile bottlenecks for the average website?

“Buuuut, I’m not Facebook”, I hear you say dear, reader. “How heavy are Parse & Compile times for average sites out in the wild?”, you might be asking. Let’s science this out!

I spent two months digging into the performance of a large set of production sites (6000+) built with different libraries and frameworks — like React, Angular, Ember and Vue. Most of the tests were recently redone on WebPageTest so you can easily redo them yourself or dig into the numbers if you wish. Here are some insights. For Website development services check Vivid Designs

Apps became interactive in 8 seconds on desktop (using cable) and 16 seconds on mobile (Moto G4 over 3G)

What contributed to this? Most apps spent an average of 4 seconds in start-up (Parse/Compile/Exec)..on desktop.

On mobile, parse times were up to 36% higher than they were on desktop.

Was everyone shipping huge JS bundles? Not as large as I had guessed, but there’s room for improvement. At the median, developers shipped 410KB of gzipped JS for their pages. This is in line with the 420KB over ‘average JS per page’ reported by the HTTPArchive. The worst offenders were sending anywhere up to 10MB of script down the wire. Oof.

HTTPArchive stat: the average page ships down 420KB of JavaScript

Script size is important, but it isn’t everything. Parse and Compile times don’t necessarily increase linearly when the script size increases. Smaller JavaScript bundles generally do result in a faster load time (regardless of our browser, device & network connection) but 200KB of our JS !== 200KB of someone else’s and can have wildly different parse and compile numbers.

Measuring JavaScript Parse & Compile today

Chrome DevTools

Timeline (Performance panel) > Bottom-Up/Call Tree/Event Log will let us drill into the amount of time spent in Parse/Compile. For a more complete picture (like the time spent in Parsing, Preparsing or Lazy Compiling), we can turn on V8’s Runtime Call Stats. In Canary, this will be in Experiments > V8 Runtime Call Stats on Timeline.

Chrome Tracing

about:tracing — Chrome’s lower-level Tracing tool allows us to use the `disabled-by-default-v8.runtime_stats` category to get deeper insights into where V8 spends its time. V8 have a step-by-step guide on how to use this that was published just the other day.

WebPageTest

WebPageTest’s “Processing Breakdown” page includes insights into V8 Compile, EvaluateScript and FunctionCall time when we do a trace with the Chrome > Capture Dev Tools Timeline enabled.

We can now also get out the Runtime Call Stats by specifying `disabled-by-default-v8.runtime_stats` as a custom Trace category (Pat Meenan of WPT now does this by default!).

For a guide on how to get the most out of this, see this gist I wrote up.

User Timing

It’s possible to measure Parse times through the User Timing API as Nolan Lawson points out below:

The third <script> here isn’t important, but it’s the first <script> being separate from the second (performance.mark() starting before the <script> has been reached) that is.

This approach can be affected on subsequent reloads by V8’s preparser. This could be worked around by appending a random string to the end of the script, something Nolan does in his optimize-js benchmarks.

I use a similar approach for measuring the impact of JavaScript Parse times using Google Analytics:

A custom Google Analytics dimension for ‘parse’ allows me to measure JavaScript parse times from real users and devices hitting my pages in the wild.

DeviceTiming

Etsy’s DeviceTiming tool can help measure parse & execution times for scripts in a controlled environment. It works by wrapping local scripts with instrumentation code so that each time our pages are hit from different devices (e.g laptops, phones, tablets) we can locally compare parse/exec. Daniel Espeset’s Benchmarking JS Parsing and Execution on Mobile Devicesgoes into more detail on this tool.

What can we do to lower our JavaScript parse times today?

  • Ship less JavaScript. The less script that requires parsing, the lower our overall time spent in the parse & compile phases will be.
  • Use code-splitting to only ship the code a user needs for a route and lazy load the rest. This probably is going to help the most to avoid parsing too much JS. Patterns like PRPL encourage this type of route-based chunking, now used by Flipkart, Housing.com and Twitter.
  • Script streaming: In the past, V8 have told developers to use `async/defer` to opt into script streaming for parse-time improvements of between 10–20%. This allows the HTML parser to at least detect the resource early, push the work to the script streaming thread and not halt the document parsing. Now that this is done for parser-blocking scripts too, I don’t think there’s anything actionable we need to do here. V8 recommend loading larger bundles earlier on as there’s only one streamer thread (more on this later)
  • Measure the parse cost of our dependencies, such as libraries and frameworks. Where possible, switch them out for dependencies with faster parse times (e.g switch React for Preact or Inferno, which require fewer bytes to bootup and have smaller parse/compile times). Paul Lewis covered framework bootup costs in a recent article. As Sebastian Markbage has also noted, a good way to measure start-up costs for frameworks is to first render a view, delete and then render again as this can tell you how it scales. The first render tends to warm up a bunch of lazily compiled code, which a larger tree can benefit from when it scales.

If our JavaScript framework of choice supports an ahead-of-time compilation mode (AoT), this can also help heavily reduce the time spent in parse/compile. Angular apps benefit from this for example: Top web development company in Hyderabad visit Vivid Designs 

Nolan Lawson’s ‘Solving the Web Performance Crisis’

What are browsers doing to improve Parse & Compile times today?

Developers are not the only ones to still be catching up on real-world start-up times being an area for improvement. V8 discovered that Octane, one of our more historical benchmarks, was a poor proxy for real-world performance on the 25 popular sites we usually test. Octane can be a poor proxy for 1) JavaScript frameworks (typically code that isn’t mono/polymorphic) and 2) real-page app startup (where most code is cold). These two use-cases are pretty important for the web. That said, Octane isn’t unreasonable for all kinds of workloads.

The V8 team has been hard at work improving start-up time and we’ve already seem some wins here:

We also estimate a 25% improve on V8 parse times for many pages looking at our Octane-Codeload numbers:

And we’re seeing wins in this area for Pinterest too. There are a number of other explorations V8 has started over the last few years to improve Parsing and Compile times.

Code caching

From using V8’s code caching

Chrome 42 introduced code caching — a way to store a local copy of compiled code so that when users returned to the page, steps like script fetching, parsing and compilation could all be skipped. At the time we noted that this change allowed Chrome to avoid about 40% of compilation time on future visits, but I want to provide a little more insight into this feature:

  • Code caching triggers for scripts that are executed twice in 72 hours.
  • For scripts of Service Worker: Code caching triggers for scripts that are executed twice in 72 hours.
  • For scripts stored in Cache Storage via Service Worker: Code caching triggers for scripts in the first execution.

So, yes. If our code is subject to caching V8 will skip parsing and compiling on the third load.

We can play around with these in chrome://flags/#v8-cache-strategies-for-cache-storage to look at the difference. We can also run Chrome with — js-flags=profile-deserialization to see if items are being loaded from the code cache (these are presented as deserialization events in the log).

One caveat with code caching is that it only caches what’s being eagerly compiled. This is generally only the top-level code that’s run once to setup global values. Function definitions are usually lazily compiled and aren’t always cached. IIFEs (for users of optimize-js ;)) are also included in the V8 code cache as they are also eagerly compiled.

Script Streaming

Script streaming allows async or defer scripts to be parsed on a separate background thread once downloading begins and improves page loading times by up to 10%. As noted earlier, this now also works for sync scripts.

Since the feature was first introduced, V8 have switched over to allowing all scriptseven parser blocking <script src=””> to be parsed on a background thread so everyone should be seeing some wins here. The only caveat is that there’s only one streaming background thread and so it makes sense to put our large/critical scripts in here first. It’s important to measure for any potential wins here.

Practically, <script defer> in the <head> so we can discover the resource early and then parse it on the background thread.

It’s also possible to check with DevTools Timeline whether the correct scripts get streamed — if there’s one big script that dominates the parse time, it would make sense to make sure it’s (usually) picked up by the streaming.

Better Parsing & Compiling

Work is ongoing for a slimmer and faster Parser that frees up memory and is more efficient with data structures. Today, the largest cause of main thread jank for V8 is the nonlinear parsing cost. Take a snippet of UMD:

(function (global, module) { … })(this, function module() { my functions })

V8 won’t know that module is definitely needed so we won’t compile it when the main script gets compiled. When we decide to compile module, we need to reparse all of the inner functions. This is what makes V8’s parse-times non-linear. Every function at n-th depth is parsed n times and causes jank.

V8 are already working on collecting info about inner functions during the initial compile, so any future compilations can ignore their inner functions. For module-style functions, this should result in a large perf improvement.

See ‘The V8 Parser(s) — Design, Challenges, and Parsing JavaScript Better’ for the full story.

V8 are also exploring offloading parts of JavaScript compilation to the background during startup.

Precompiling JavaScript?

Every few years, it’s proposed engines offer a way to precompile scripts so we don’t waste time parsing or compiling code pops up. The idea is if instead, a build-time or server-side tool can just generate bytecode, we’d see a large win on start-up time. My opinion is shipping bytecode can increase your load-time (it’s larger) and you would likely need to sign the code and process it for security. V8’s position is for now we think exploring avoiding reparsing internally will help see a decent enough boost that precompilation may not offer too much more, but are always open to discussing ideas that can lead to faster startup times. That said, V8 are exploring being more aggressive at compiling and code-caching scripts when you update a site in a Service Worker and we hope to see some wins with this work.

We discussed precompilation at BlinkOn 7 with Facebook and Akamai and my notes can be found here.

The Optimize JS lazy-parsing parens ‘hack’

JavaScript engines like V8 have a lazy parsing heuristic where they pre-parse most of the functions in our scripts before doing a complete round of parsing (e.g to check for syntax errors). This is based on the idea that most pages have JS functions that are lazily executed if at all.

Pre-parsing can speed up startup times by only checking the minimal a browser needs to know about functions. This breaks down with IIFEs. Although engines try to skip pre-parsing for them, the heuristics aren’t always reliable and this is where tools like optimize-js can be useful.

optimize-js parses our scripts in advance, inserts parenthesis where it knows (or assumes via heuristics) functions will be immediately executed enabling faster execution. Some of the paren-hacked functions are sure bets (e.g IIFEs with !). Others are based on heuristics (e.g in a Browserify or Webpack bundle it’s assumed all modules are eagerly loaded which isn’t necessarily the case). Eventually, V8 hopes for such hacks to not be required but for now this is an optimization we can consider if we know what you’re doing.

V8 are also working on reducing the cost for cases where we guess wrong, and that should also reduce the need for the parens hack

Conclusions

Start-up performance matters. A combination of slow parse, compile and execution times can be a real bottleneck for pages that wish to boot-up quickly. Measure how long your pages spend in this phase. Discover what you can do to make it faster.

We’ll keep working on improving V8 start-up performance from our end as much as we can. We promise 😉 Happy perfing!

Source

Voip Business Phone Systems Are Advantageous For Enterprises Functioning

In today’s competitive corporate world, every business firm, whether small or large, has to make good use of modern communication technologies, in order to present a competitive and customer friendly approach. Effective communication has a key role to play in the success of every business, regardless of the medium used. As a faster medium of communication, small business phone systems have their own specific role to play in the smooth running of an organization. Whenever we talk about small business phone systems, the technology that comes to our minds is the Private Branch Exchange system, commonly referred to as PBX. It can be called the private telephone exchange of any business firm or office, but is often recommended as an economical option for firms, where the number of employees is greater than forty. Check for Voip Business Phone Systems in Linkedphone

The installation of VoIP communication systems in a business enterprise has now become an essential requirement to increase productivity, reduce costs and improve efficiency. The VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) phone system is a powerful and easy to use telephone system that allows you to make phone calls directly from your computer. To use a VoIP business phone system, there is no need to invest in special equipment. All that is required is a regular telephone with an Internet connection.

Whether for a small enterprise or the largest enterprises, this communication system can resolve many of the communication problems that you might have with your regular phone lines. When compared to traditional phone lines, VoIP phone systems are an affordable option, and best of all, these help to maintain hassle-free communication, within the organization as well as outside, with the associated advanced features and great calling plans. VoIP business phone systems are advantageous for enterprises functioning in multiple locations. The biggest advantages of Voice over IP telephone systems are the great convenience they offer, and the many amazing features. The key features include auto attendant, pager notify, voice to email, inbound caller ID lookup, outbound caller ID blocking, call waiting, music on hold, e-mail message delivery, cell phone message notify, speed dialing, multiple find-me numbers per extension, last dialed redial, do not disturb option, and custom menus.

The advantages that can be gained by using VoIP phone systems are: • Unify multiple employees at different locations with one phone number • Transfer calls easily to anyone, anywhere • No new hardware required; use existing phones • Prioritize your calls • Easier to install and manage • Simplified management

However, there are a few disadvantages associated with VoIP business phone systems. The network requirements and the potential for outages are its two main drawbacks. Once you decide to purchase an IP communication system for your business, the next step is to determine which piece of equipment is right for you. A number of hosted PBX telephone system service providers are active in the market, offering different models of telecommunication systems with great features to drive your business forward and ensure its future success. Before deciding on any one service, you should gain a clear understanding of its great features, service plans, ratesFind Article, and the maintenance costs involved.